Tags

Mid-Year Book Freak Out Tag

I think this tag has become a staple of the summer book-blogging calendar! The tag was first created by booktubers ReadLikeWildfire and Earl Grey Books and has become an annual tag that pops up everywhere during June and July on book blogs. It was one of the first posts I ever did, probably, as I started blogging (on Tumblr) in June of last year. Here’s where you can find last year’s answers (now on this blog). I debated whether I was going to do one at all, especially as I really wanted to do a post looking at my goals and some statistics too (which you can find here!) but the two posts are so different, so I definitely had to do the tag too!

Continue Reading
3 Stars Reviews

Review: Pan’s Labyrinth by Guillermo Del Toro and Cornelia Funke

Inspired by the film of the same name, Guillermo del Toro and Cornelia Funke brings this nightmarish fairytale to book form. In Spain during the summer of 1944, the aftermath of the civil war plays out in the forests, in between the trees and under the cover of darkness. Republican rebels hide out in the woods, hunted by the capitán and his soldiers who make an old mill their base. Ofelia and her mother, who is heavily pregnant and very weak, arrive at the mill to be reunited with Captain Vidal, Ofelia’s new stepfather. Most do not take notice of her, the cruel capitán is irritated by her presence, but under the ground, creatures are stirring – they sense the return of the long-lost Princess Moanna. Ofelia discovers an overgrown labyrinth and meets the Fawn, who sets her three tasks to prove she is the missing Princess. Ofelia’s love of fairytales guides her, but things soon become far more sinister than they ever did in her storybooks.

Continue Reading
Monthly Updates

Stacking the Shelves: June

This month I’ve added a YA book – an unusual pick for me – with a fat black queer protagonist, a debut novella about sex and obsession, a thrilling sequel to one of my favourite May reads, and another debut about a feminist cult.

Continue Reading
Readathons

Sims-A-Thon Wrap-Up

I decided to do BiancaReads’ Sims-themed readathon – Sims-a-thon – this month, and had so much fun picking books for the prompts and collecting points for each read! It seems like it came at a perfect time too, as the latest Sims 4 expansion pack, Island Living, came out at the end of June. You can see my original TBR post here, which also explains all about how the readathon works. I obviously didn’t stick to my original reading plan, because when do I ever? But here’s what I did read, and how many points those books got me!

Continue Reading
Monthly Updates

Mid-Year Reading Round-Up

Can you believe we’re in July already?! As we’re halfway through 2019, I’ve seen a lot of people doing ‘Mid-Year’ posts, mostly the ‘Mid-Year Book Freak Out Tag’, created by ReadLikeWildfire and Earl Grey Books. I will be doing the tag sometime soon but first, I decided to check in with my reading goals. I want to see if I’m on track to achieve the targets I set myself at the beginning of the year, and also take a look at any trends that seem to have emerged so far! I haven’t included anything I’ve read the past week or so, so these stats are for exactly the first six months of the year: January 1st to June 30th.

Continue Reading
2 Stars Reviews

Review: If Cats Disappeared From the World by Genki Kawamura

Within the first few pages of If Cats Disappeared From the World, the narrator learns of his imminent death. He returns to his apartment, where he lives alone with little contact with his family following his mother’s death, and seeks solace in the fur of his beloved cat, Cabbage. Before he can truly come to terms with his prognosis, he encounters the Devil, a Hawaiian-shirt-clad version of himself who informs him that he has just a day to live. But the Devil offers him a deal: in exchange for removing one thing from the world, the narrator will be granted an additional day of life. What follows is an unusual week of decisions, in which our narrator learns what really matters to him and what he’s willing to lose in order to live.

Continue Reading
5 Stars Reviews

Review: Text Me When You Get Home by Kayleen Schaefer

Kayleen Schaefer’s debut takes a personal and sociological look at the way friendships between women have developed throughout history, to become more nuanced and intimate than ever. Drawing on personal experience and interviews with friends, celebrities, writers, and historians, Schaefer renders a touching account of the importance of friendship in strengthening and supporting our life experiences.

Continue Reading