whistle in the dark
4 Stars Reviews

Review: Whistle in the Dark by Emma Healey

When Jen and Hugh Maddox’s daughter, Lana, goes missing on an art retreat in the Peak District, they fear the worst. But four days later, Lana is found, bruised and bleeding but alive. When they ask her what happened, and where she had been, her only answers are ‘I got lost’ and ‘I can’t remember’. The family try to return to their normal lives, but Jen’s need to know what happened leaders to her constant surveillance of Lana’s life, driving them further and further apart, until Jen’s obsession steers her into dangerous territory.

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4 Stars Reviews

Review: Where the Line Bleeds by Jesmyn Ward

Twin brothers Christophe and Joshua are about to graduate high school. Their feelings are mixed; joyful for the freedom they will finally have but apprehensive about how they will manage to make money to enjoy that freedom. Growing up in a poverty-ridden black community in rural Mississippi, the boys have few promising prospects. Gifted a car by their absent mother, they begin driving around the towns surrounding their home of Bois Sauvage, hunting for work. When Joshua gets a job working the docks on the Gulf Coast, Christophe becomes jealous and increasingly desperate to help contribute something to his ageing grandmother, who continues to care for the twins despite her blindness. He turns to his cousin Dunny and to drug-dealing, which widens the growing gulf between himself and his twin, who fears Christophe is veering down a path dangerously similar to that of their addict father, Sandman. Christophe’s choices set both the twins on course to a violent encounter with their father that could forever alter their lives.

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4 Stars Reviews

Review: Daisy Jones & The Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Taylor Jenkins Reid’s hugely hyped up novel, Daisy Jones & The Six, comes after the success of her 2017 hit, The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo. Both play with an interview format, spanning the ups and downs of hugely successful celebrity icons. Daisy Jones & The Six follows the eponymous character, Daisy Jones, as she joins forces with rock band The Six to become one of the biggest groups of the 70s. Fuelled by sex, drugs, and rock ‘n’ roll they embark on a rip-roaring career with a killer album and a sold-out tour to boot. But following one of their best shows, and at the peak of their success, they suddenly disband with no explanation, leaving fans heartbroken and bewildered. Decades later, the band and those close to them open up about what happened with Daisy Jones & The Six.

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4 Stars Reviews

Review: Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman by Lindy West

Lindy West grew up as a big girl in a world that tells women they should be small. She grew up with opinions in a world where women should be quiet. The subtitle of this book suggests a collection of essays, but it is really more of a memoir that is both humorous and heart-wrenching. From internet trolls to abortion clinics, Shrill takes you through the experiences that made Lindy West loud, and unapologetically so.

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4 Stars Reviews

Review: Happy Fat by Sofie Hagen

Sofie Hagen is a comedian, writer, and podcaster who wants to reclaim the word ‘fat’. Her debut book is part memoir, part social commentary on how society seeks to make us smaller. Drawing on her own experiences as a child and as an adult, and on the experiences of other fat activists and educators, Sofie builds an empowering book full of comical and sometimes moving anecdotes which show the reader that it is okay to be both happy and fat.

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4 Stars Reviews

Review: Last of the Magpies by Mark Edwards

The electrifying conclusion to the three-part thriller series The Magpies, Last of the Magpies puts to bed the furious game of cat and mouse that psychopath Lucy has been playing with Jamie and Kirsty for years. After Lucy’s last-minute escape, Jamie teams up with true crime podcast host Emma in a bid to flush out his tormentor and end her reign of terror over both his and Kirsty’s lives, once and for all.

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4 Stars Reviews

Review: Everything Under by Daisy Johnson

Gretel hasn’t seen her mother in sixteen years. Growing up on a boat on the Oxfordshire canals, Gretel and her mother created a world of their own, with words of their own, and a creature they called the Bonak that haunts the dark currents of the river. Now Gretel is grown, a lexicographer who tries to make sense of the words of the real world whilst not being able to make sense of her own past. Too many questions are left unanswered, and she hunts hospitals and morgues searching for her mother and for answers that only her mother can give her. When the two are reunited, Gretel begins to trawl through fragmented memories and asks, what happened to Marcus? What happened to the boy that lived with us that winter?

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4 Stars Reviews

Review: The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

A short story that has become a staple of feminist literature, The Yellow Wallpaper consists of journal entries by a young woman who slowly descends into madness. The narrator is taken to a colonial mansion by her physician husband in an attempt to cure her ‘nervous depression’ through rest and relaxation. Sternly advised not to write or take up any pastime, the narrator takes to examining the garish yellow wallpaper in the room she’s staying in, soon becoming convinced that there is a woman trapped behind the florid patterns.

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4 Stars Reviews

Review: Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman

Neil Gaiman has long been inspired by gods of old and with Norse Mythology he lends his pen to retelling the stories of his favourites. Exploring origin stories of Yggdrasil and Odin, and the many tales of Thor, Loki, and Freya, Gaiman breaths new life into these classic Nordic myths.

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