Review

Review: Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman by Lindy West

Lindy West grew up as a big girl in a world that tells women they should be small. She grew up with opinions in a world where women should be quiet. The subtitle of this book suggests a collection of essays, but it is really more of a memoir that is both humorous and heart-wrenching. From internet trolls to abortion clinics, Shrill takes you through the experiences that made Lindy West loud, and unapologetically so.

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Review

Review: Happy Fat by Sofie Hagen

Sofie Hagen is a comedian, writer, and podcaster who wants to reclaim the word ‘fat’. Her debut book is part memoir, part social commentary on how society seeks to make us smaller. Drawing on her own experiences as a child and as an adult, and on the experiences of other fat activists and educators, Sofie builds an empowering book full of comical and sometimes moving anecdotes which show the reader that it is okay to be both happy and fat.

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Review: Last of the Magpies by Mark Edwards

The electrifying conclusion to the three-part thriller series The Magpies, Last of the Magpies puts to bed the furious game of cat and mouse that psychopath Lucy has been playing with Jamie and Kirsty for years. After Lucy’s last-minute escape, Jamie teams up with true crime podcast host Emma in a bid to flush out his tormentor and end her reign of terror over both his and Kirsty’s lives, once and for all.

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Review: Everything Under by Daisy Johnson

Gretel hasn’t seen her mother in sixteen years. Growing up on a boat on the Oxfordshire canals, Gretel and her mother created a world of their own, with words of their own, and a creature they called the Bonak that haunts the dark currents of the river. Now Gretel is grown, a lexicographer who tries to make sense of the words of the real world whilst not being able to make sense of her own past. Too many questions are left unanswered, and she hunts hospitals and morgues searching for her mother and for answers that only her mother can give her. When the two are reunited, Gretel begins to trawl through fragmented memories and asks, what happened to Marcus? What happened to the boy that lived with us that winter?

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Review: The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

A short story that has become a staple of feminist literature, The Yellow Wallpaper consists of journal entries by a young woman who slowly descends into madness. The narrator is taken to a colonial mansion by her physician husband in an attempt to cure her ‘nervous depression’ through rest and relaxation. Sternly advised not to write or take up any pastime, the narrator takes to examining the garish yellow wallpaper in the room she’s staying in, soon becoming convinced that there is a woman trapped behind the florid patterns.

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Review: Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman

Neil Gaiman has long been inspired by gods of old and with Norse Mythology he lends his pen to retelling the stories of his favourites. Exploring origin stories of Yggdrasil and Odin, and the many tales of Thor, Loki, and Freya, Gaiman breaths new life into these classic Nordic myths.

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Review: The Wych Elm by Tana French

Toby’s perfect life is brutally interrupted when a seemingly random burglary leaves him physically and mentally traumatised. When he gets the devastating news that his beloved Uncle Hugo is dying, he decides to move into his childhood summer home, The Ivy House, to care for him and recoup himself. But when his nephew discovers a human skull in the wych elm at the bottom of the garden, Toby is forced to question everything he thought he knew about his idyllic teenage summers at The Ivy House.

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