Review

Review: Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman by Lindy West

Lindy West grew up as a big girl in a world that tells women they should be small. She grew up with opinions in a world where women should be quiet. The subtitle of this book suggests a collections of essays, but it is really more of a memoir that is both humourous and heart wrenching. From internet trolls to abortion clinics, Shrill takes you through the experiences that made Lindy West loud, and unapologetically so.

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Review: Happy Fat by Sofie Hagen

Sofie Hagen is a comedian, writer, and podcaster who wants to reclaim the word ‘fat’. Her debut book is part memoir, part social commentary on how society seeks to make us smaller. Drawing on her own experiences as a child and as an adult, and on the experiences of other fat activists and educators, Sofie builds an empowering book full of comical and sometimes moving anecdotes which show the reader that it is okay to be both happy and fat.

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Review: Bleaker House by Nell Stevens

When Nell Stevens is given a fellowship grant to spend three months where ever she wants to write, she chooses one of the most remote places she can. Wanting a sabbatical from distractions, Nell travels to Bleaker, a small island in the Falklands with only sheep, penguins, and a copy of Dickens’ Bleak House to keep her company. Bleaker House chronicles her short time on the island and the writing process of her novel.

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Review: Zlata’s Diary – A Child’s Life in Wartime Sarajevo by Zlata Filipović

Zlata’s Diary begins as the daily musings of a typical 11-year-old girl, who loves music and her friends. Soon after she starts her diary, war breaks out and Sarajevo becomes a battleground that changes Zlata’s life forever. With no more school or music lessons, the highlights of Zlata’s days are birthdays celebrated with canned food rations, whilst her worst days find her saying goodbye to escaping family and grieving for lost friends.

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Review: The Romanovs by Simon Sebag Montefiore

Montefiore charts the ascension and downfall of one of the most intriguing royal families in history, the Romanovs. Ruling Russia for over three centuries from 1613 until their brutal assassinations in 1917, the Romanovs spawned 18 tsars and tsarinas. Their reigns gave rise to multiple myths and legends and more than a few impostor heirs. This tome explores the political and the personal lives of this legendary dynasty.

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Review: Vagina: A Re-Education by Lynn Enright

Vagina teaches us everything we weren’t told in school, and corrects a lot of what we were told. It challenges myths and taboos, and confronts social issues related to women’s health such as period poverty, transgender rights, medical care, and FGM. Vagina seeks to re-educate everyone about an organ that over half the world’s population have but which many don’t understand at all. This lack of education creates serious issues across the world. Enright sets out to change that, by giving readers with vaginas the information they need to understand their own bodies.

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Review: Heart Berries by Terese Marie Mailhot

When Terese Marie Mailhot finds herself hospitalised due to a combination of PTSD and bipolar, she is given a notebook and begins to write. Heart Berries is what this notebook became. Part memoir, part memorial, Mailhot uncovers her sometimes troubling relationships with her parents and her lovers and tries to make sense of them and herself.

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